How to reset SYSASM password

By sysasm user can maintain ASM instance. The main idea is to separate storage administrator and database administrator responsibilities. To reset its password, do the following:

[oracle@r1n1 ~]$ . oraenv
ORACLE_SID = [orcl1] ? +ASM1
The Oracle base for ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/11.2.0/grid is /u01/app/oracle

[oracle@r1n1 ~]$ asmcmd
ASMCMD> orapwusr –modify –password sys
Enter password: ********

How to restore file permissions of the installed package to its default on Linux?

Hello all,

(Please, note that in command string instead of “” there are two dashes “- -“ like “–setperms” it is “– -setperms”)

By mistake, I run the following command on / directory:

chmod -R 777 *

I stopped this command, but unfortunately some file permissions were changed.

Because of that, I was not able to connect to the server with WinSCP and ssh was not working.

I looked in to the /var/log/messages and found the following entry:

Sep  6 15:02:37 stbynode sshd[24226]: fatal: /var/empty/sshd must be owned by root and not group or world-writable.

I run the following command on another server:

ls -la /var/empty/sshd
total 16
drwx–x–x 3 root root 4096 Sep 3 21:07 .
drwxr-xr-x 3 root root 4096 Sep 3 21:07 ..
drwxr-xr-x 2 root root 4096 Sep 3 21:36 etc

On my server it was:

ls -la /var/empty/sshd
total 16
drwxrwxrwx 3 root root 4096 Sep 3 14:00 .
drwxrwxrwx 3 root root 4096 Sep 3 14:00 ..
drwxrwxrwx 2 root root 4096 Sep 3 14:00 etc

You can change these permissions by hand (that will be boring if not only one file permissions have been changed)but there exist one very useful command:

rpm  –setperms {packagename}

This will reset package permissions, because of rpm database contains permission information.

So I run the following :

for p in $(rpm -qa); do rpm –setperms $p; done

Note this script will reset permissions of the  installed package, not user created file…

After completed this command , I was able to connect to the server with WinScp and  /var/empty/sshd permissions were set to drwxr-xr-x

To avoid such kind of situation my advice would be to save permission information everyday. By running the following command using crontab:

find / -exec stat –format “chmod %a ${MPOINT}%n” {} \; > /tmp/permissionsbackup.sh

Good Luck , I hope the post was helpful…